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Details released on the state of Canadian Infrastructure: roads, bridges, tunnels

Statistical information on national infrastructure assets will be released throughout the fall of 2018 and will provide baselines for comparing assets over time.


Statistics Canada has published the first results of Canada’s Core Public Infrastructure Survey, this first release focuses on roads, bridges and tunnels.

Sponsored by Infrastructure Canada, the survey results will provide data to support all levels of government and policy makers in monitoring the condition of Canada’s core public infrastructure, with the intent of improving their management and lifespan, and developing future infrastructure projects. Data for the survey are based on responses from approximately 1,500 government organizations in 2016 selected from Statistics Canada’s Business Register, the central repository of information on public and private organizations operating in Canada.

Of note: there were 47,279 publicly-owned bridges in 2016, 43.9% of which were on local roads, 24.6% on highways and expressways, and 26.0% on arterial and collector roads combined. Almost one-third (30.7%) of all bridges in Canada were in Ontario, while 21.5% were in Alberta and 17.1% were in Quebec. About one-fifth of bridges have been built since 2000.

survey

(Statistics Canada)

Building on this first release, statistical information on national infrastructure assets will be released throughout the fall of 2018 and will provide baselines for comparing assets over time.

The data will examine the inventory, condition, performance and asset management strategy of nine core public infrastructure assets:

  • roads;
  • bridges and tunnels;
  • potable water;
  • waste water;
  • storm water;
  • public transit;
  • solid waste;
  • culture, recreation and sports facilities;
  • and public social and affordable housing.

Statistics Canada is working with Infrastructure Canada to explore the possibility of producing this survey on a recurring basis to develop a broader overview of Canada’s public infrastructures over time.

 


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1 Comment » for Details released on the state of Canadian Infrastructure: roads, bridges, tunnels
  1. Our Company Integrated Airport Systems Ltd specialize in Airport infrastructure, and I am very surprised that Airports were not included in the study. There are no Airports in Alberta that we have inspected that fully meet Transport Canada T.P 312 5th Edition Standards and Codes. This includes International, Certified and Registered Airports. In our opinion they are all unsafe. Nav Canada continue to approve GPS approaches for both Certified and Registered airports where the supporting infrastructure is not code compliant. I have expressed my concern about this practice and brought this to the attention of both Transport Canada and Nav Canada authorities and each of them say its not their responsibility to ensure infrastructure code compliance. There is no oversight by any authority having jurisdiction. It is only a question of time and circumstances until a serious accident occurs.

    The owners and principals of our firm are former Transport Canada employees and have over 40 years of experience in Airport infrastructure. I am a Professional Engineer with a pilots licence and I am aware of the unsafe aviation conditions. In discussing my concerns with the authorities I have never been challenged in respect to my determinations and conclusions. The response has been for each one to blame the other and not take any action. Because I am very concerned for the Public Safety of our Air Transportation system, I am requesting you include Airports in your study. We have worked in other Provinces and the Alberta situation is not unique. This same situation exists in other regions of the country.

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