Canadian Consulting Engineer

NOTEWORTHY (March 01, 1999)

Learning from Bre-XThe gold mining scam that saw investors lose $3 billion with Bre-X Inc. shares last year could have a long-lasting impact on geoscientists. Task forces attached to the Toronto Stock...

March 1, 1999   Canadian Consulting Engineer

Learning from Bre-X

The gold mining scam that saw investors lose $3 billion with Bre-X Inc. shares last year could have a long-lasting impact on geoscientists. Task forces attached to the Toronto Stock Exchange and the Montreal Stock Exchange and Quebec Securities Commission simultaneously issued reports in February calling for major changes to mining claims procedures. The task forces suggested that any announcement of resource discoveries should be accompanied by a geological report by an authorized and qualified mining engineer, geologist or geological engineer. In most cases, the qualified person must also be independent. Both task forces want the geoscientists to set up a self-regulating professional body with disciplinary powers to ensure they adhere to standards.

Quebec training rules to change

The Ordre des ingenieurs du Quebec (OIQ) is waiting approval from the provincial Office of the Professions to raise its experience requirement to three years from two. The Ordre also wants approval to switch the name “ingnieur stagiaire” (engineer in training) to “ingnieur junior.” Apparently members feel that the former title can be pejorative

Also, like its counterpart association in Ontario, the OIQ is seriously considering restructuring into two organizations: one to concentrate on the role of protecting the public, and another to serve and protect the members’ own needs.

Help with custom site investigations

Southam has launched a service to make it easier to research the environmental history of any site in Ontario for potential hazards. The EcoLog ERIS service accesses federal and provincial government databases as well as private sector records. The company recently signed a working agreement with the Ontario Ministry of the Environment that will guarantee the supply of up-to-date and historical information.

In less than two weeks the ERIS researchers will provide a report of the site, including environmental compliance records, orders, approvals, spill reports, etc., not only of the history of the subject property, but also of a 350-metre buffer zone around it. The company intends eventually to expand the service across the country. See www.ecologeris.com or call (416) 442-2105.

Construction sites fit to breathe in

Massachusetts Highways Department is paying $11,000 per vehicle to stop heavy construction equipment from belching out diesel fumes and other air pollution on the Central Artery Harbour Tunnel project (see page 68). The money will pay for catalytic converters and particulate filters to be installed on 70 contractor-owned backhoes, cranes and other heavy equipment. The move will eliminate pollution equivalent to that from 1,300 diesel buses.


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