Canadian Consulting Engineer

News

Canada launches new fund to support environmental infrastructure

The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund will support large-scale infrastructure projects with a minimum cost of $20 million like diversion channels, wetland restorations, wildfire barriers and setback levees.


The federal government has launched the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF), a 10-year $2 billion national program that will invest in projects that help communities better withstand natural hazards such as floods, wildfires, seismic events and droughts.

DMAF will support large-scale infrastructure projects with a minimum cost of $20 million like diversion channels, wetland restorations, wildfire barriers and setback levees.

These projects will safeguard public health and safety, protect people’s homes, make sure access to essential services is not interrupted, and help communities protect their residents’ quality of life.

Applicants wishing to be considered for funding under the program will have until July 31, 2018, to submit an Expression of Interest to Infrastructure Canada.

Eligible applicants include, but are not limited to, provinces and territories; municipal and regional governments; Canadian public or not-for-profit post-secondary institutions that partner with a Canadian municipality; and band councils and First Nation, Inuit or Métis governments.

For the full eligibility list and other program details, visit the Infrastructure Canada website.


Print this page

Related Posts



2 Comments » for Canada launches new fund to support environmental infrastructure
  1. Al Workman says:

    Care will need to be taken to ensure these funds are not bled away into projects that will be inconsequential given that climate change is a long-term reality we must deal with. Even by reducing man-made contributors, human engineering will need to be very resourceful to mitigate changes that began in the late stages of the last ice age, some 12,000 years ago. Those managing this new fund must resist the temptation to throw money at trivial solutions to trivial problems, however given the propensity for government projects to inflate unreasonably, I fear that a $20M project threshold will prove to be too low to prevent this from happening.

    • Duncan says:

      Al;
      Yes, $2B is arguably not enough to address all of Canada’s climate change weaknesses. I think the hope would be that in the future there is another $2B put into the DMAF. This is better than nothing. It would be interesting to know what sort of process the government takes to evaluate the project proposals (cost/benefit analysis).

Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*