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Canadian synchotron built with help of consulting engineers

The Canadian Light Source Synchotron was officially opened October 22, marking the culmination of a $174-million pr...


The Canadian Light Source Synchotron was officially opened October 22, marking the culmination of a $174-million project in which consulting engineers were intricately involved.
Located at the University of Saskatchewan, the synchotron is Canada’s largest science project in 30 years.
The football-field sized facility uses powerful magnets to accelerate electrons to nearly the speed of light, creating a light billions of times more intense than the sun. Researchers use the light to penetrate to the heart of materials and matter in nearly all scientific fields. The light created is infrared, ultraviolet and X-ray, shone down beamlines to small laboratory end-stations.
Aside from being used to make better microchips and finding a cleaner engine oil, for example, the technology can be used to research bioremediation methods, such as cleaning up contaminated soil using insects.
UMA Group (Barry Hawkins, P.Eng.) consulting engineers, oversaw the building project. Loken Engineering Services of Saskatoon helped with the machine design engineering on the Soft X-Ray Spectomicroscopy Beamline.
The Canadian Light Source is hoping that 2,000 researchers will come from around the world every year to use its facilities.