Canadian Consulting Engineer

Jobs set for SNC-Lavalin’s nuclear engineers

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear is to begin helping Atomic Energy of Canada Limited refurbish Argentina's Embalse Nuclear Generating Station, following the signing of a contract on August 25 between AECL and Nucleoeléctrica Argentina Sociedad...

August 29, 2011   Canadian Consulting Engineer

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear is to begin helping Atomic Energy of Canada Limited refurbish Argentina’s Embalse Nuclear Generating Station, following the signing of a contract on August 25 between AECL and Nucleoeléctrica Argentina Sociedad Anónima (NASA).

SNEC-Lavalin Group is due to acquire the CANDU Reactor Division from AECL. Once that transaction is finalized, SNC-Lavalin’s subsidiary Candu Energy Inc. will take over full responsibility for the Argentinian project.

The scope of work includes providing key technologies and tools to support the retubing project as well as engineering and supply for the plant upgrades.

NASA will be the overall project manager and will directly carry out all reactor component procurement and oversee the on-site work.  The work is intended to extend the plant’s life by 25 to 30 years.  The contract value is approximately $440 million.

“This contract is a good example of the opportunities that lie ahead for Candu, and a testament to Canada’s long association with Argentina in the field of nuclear energy,” said Patrick Lamarre, Executive Vice-President, SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. “We look forward to expanding our cooperation with the Argentinian nuclear industry, not only for this refurbishment project, but for future nuclear projects in Argentina, elsewhere in South America and in the global market.”

“The Embalse project will provide several years of high-value work for employees of the Canadian nuclear industry,” said Hugh MacDiarmid, President and CEO of AECL.

The Embalse CANDU 6 reactor began commercial operation in January 1984. The single-unit has a gross output of 648 MWe and was originally designed by AECL. 

Retubing the reactor involves removing and replacing all 760 reactor feeders as well as 380 fuel channels and 380 calandria tubes. Remotely controlled tools and massive, highly shielded machines are required to conduct the work safely inside the reactor due to the radioactive environment.


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