Canadian Consulting Engineer

News

City of Peterborough to convert 7,205 streetlights to LED

The City expects the conversion to Smart technology LED fixtures will reduce annual electricity costs by 54% or by $650,000, reduce maintenance costs by 80% or by $187,000 and reduce its annual electricity consumption for streetlights by 70% or by 3.6 million kilowatt hours.


The City of Peterborough, located 120km east of Toronto, has announced that starting the last week of September, it will begin converting 7,205 streetlights to light emitting diode (LED) streetlight fixtures to reduce energy use, electricity costs and maintenance costs.

In a media release the City estimates that the conversion to Smart technology LED fixtures will reduce annual electricity costs by 54% or by $650,000, reduce maintenance costs by 80% or by $187,000 and reduce the City’s annual electricity consumption for streetlights by 70% or by 3.6 million kilowatt hours.

The $5.2-million project is supported with $683,428 from the Save on Energy program. Based on the projected savings on electricity, maintenance costs and project costs, the City expects to recover the cost of the project through savings in seven years.

“That’s a substantial savings in terms of costs and energy use,” said Bruno Bianco, Infrastructure Planning Manager with the City of Peterborough, in the release.

Touting the smart technology, the City cites the LED streetlight fixtures as energy efficient, virtually maintenance-free, environmentally friendly and last up to four times longer than traditional High Pressure Sodium streetlights. LED lighting is also able to be targeted in a more precise manner than traditional street lighting, reducing glare and lighting only targeted areas.

The conversion project includes a change from a drop glass fixture to a flat glass fixture, which changes how light is distributed on the roadway and associated area. This change helps prevent light from spilling or dispersing onto adjacent spaces where it is not intended to be. The light colour is a cool white (not a daylight).

The Smart technology being added to the lights will automatically inform the City when a light is out or malfunctioning to allow a crew to be dispatched to repair the fixture. The LED streetlight conversion project is expected to be completed by the end of December 2018.