Canadian Consulting Engineer

By CCE   

SNC-Lavalin launches Decarbonomics net-zero initiative for buildings

Buildings Cleantech Canada News building services buildings built environment carbon emissions data analytics data visualization Decarbonomics Engineering Net Zero retrofit SNC-Lavalin

The new service aims to decarbonize the built environment cost-effectively.

Decarbonomics

Image courtesy SNC-Lavalin.

Today, Montreal-headquartered SNC-Lavalin launched Decarbonomics, a data-based initiative to decarbonize the built environment cost-effectively and accelerate global efforts to achieve net-zero emissions.

Building on the firm’s experience in project management, building services, engineering design, data visualization, asset management, cost consulting and data analytics, the initiative aims to help both the private and public sectors reduce the carbon emissions of existing infrastructure at pace to meet future targets.

The built environment contributes approximately 40% of global emissions. The majority of buildings that will need to meet performance targets in 2050 have already been built, so retrofitting and changes in tenants’ behaviour will be necessary.

“Creating the net-zero communities of the future relies in part on effective decarbonization of existing assets,” says Ian L. Edwards, president and CEO of SNC-Lavalin. “Decarbonomics is a concrete example of how we can help clients meet their targets.”

Advertisement

The end-to-end service comprises a three-step approach: benchmarking (developing a carbon baseline), roadmap (designing a cost-effective path to reducing carbon) and delivery (implementing carbon-reduction solutions). The initiative is underpinned by Carbon Data Insights, as well as SNC-Lavalin’s own data.

“Decarbonomics is founded on the principle of systems thinking,” says Stuart McLaren, the initiative’s development director. “Making carbon visible at the portfolio level empowers clients to make much more informed decisions about their investments.”

Advertisement

Stories continue below

Print this page

Related Stories