Canadian Consulting Engineer
Sept-Îles Hospital

Photo courtesy Government of Quebec.

The Société Québécoise des Infrastructures (SQI) has awarded three contracts to Montreal-headquartered SNC-Lavalin for the major redevelopment and expansion of the Hospital of Chicoutimi, Charles Le Moyne Hospital and Sept-Îles Hospital (pictured).

In an effort to strengthen health-care infrastructure at all three sites, a central focus of the projects will be the expansion and redevelopment of the facilities’ operating rooms (ORs) and specialized care units (SCUs).

“Expansion and modernization work at these hospitals will measurably increase capacity and improve patient care,” says Ben Almond, SNC-Lavalin’s CEO of engineering services for Canada. “Our track record executing such projects in Quebec is well-known, as we have delivered much of the province’s health-care infrastructure.”

By way of example, the firm expanded the Sainte-Justine Hospital Centre, constructed the Montreal Shriners Hospital for Children, expanded the new Enfant-Jésus Hospital complex, redeveloped and expanded the emergency room (ER) and modernized critical care units (CCUs) for the Montreal Heart Institute and constructed the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) at the school’s Glen Campus.

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Under the new contracts with SQI, SNC-Lavalin’s engineering services group and consortium partners will provide design, site surveillance, building information modelling (BIM) management and value engineering services over the next five years. The firm will also support efforts to achieve LEED green building certifications through decarbonization.

Cross-functional project teams, based in Montreal and Quebec City, will include structural, civil, mechanical and electrical engineers with hospital project experience.

“Governments are investing heavily in health-care infrastructure,” says SNC-Lavalin president and CEO Ian L. Edwards, “and we have regional and global expertise across health care and life sciences.”

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