Canadian Consulting Engineer

ASHRAE launches new tool for predicting human comfort

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)  has launched an updated tool for predicting thermal comfort for occupants in a building. The software allows you to calculate the predicted thermal...

November 1, 2011   Canadian Consulting Engineer

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)  has launched an updated tool for predicting thermal comfort for occupants in a building. The software allows you to calculate the predicted thermal comfort for a human at a point in space,” said Bill Fleming, chair of ASHRAE’s publications committee. “All you need to do a comfort analysis is some basic information about the thermal environment you want to model and a few things about the person you want to put in that environment. The ASHRAE Thermal Comfort Tool, Version 2, is consistent with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-2010, Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.”


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1 Comment » for ASHRAE launches new tool for predicting human comfort
  1. Mariette West says:

    Our building is close to the end of the Point Grey Peninsula in Vancouver. There is a LOT of wind here especially in the winter, spring and fall. The windows take a lot of weather… rain, wind and sun. Our unit faces many different directions and does have tremendous views. We have windows facing south (along the bedrooms, master bathroom, kitchen and one part of the L shaped living areas. There are also large banks of windows facing north and north east and also north west.

    Our unit, on the 10th floor of the building which has 14 floors, and our floor seems to be a vulnerable spot according to the literature I have read on Stack Effect, etc. There are 5 floors above us (floors 11, 12, 15, 16 and 17). Apparently we do not seem to have a lot of air leakage via our windows however the jury is out on that as the data was lost. There are multi-frame aluminium windows. The unit is largely windows and concrete support columns… those two are the only elements that form our exterior walls.
    We are not sure what to do next as we cannot even find out the R and U Values of our windows. They are Starline windows installed in 2007. We are at UBC, so under the provincial building code, not under the city of Vancouver.

    We are very cold and uncomfortable in spite of spending $757 for two months of heat in the two months of December and January to heat a 1425 square foot unit. The measures of temperature indicate a tremendous difference (up to 6 or 7 degrees) in various spots in any given room). With the electric floor wall heaters (under the windows) set to 30 degrees it is difficult to achieve a room temperature of 20 degrees during the coldest part of the windows. More significantly we experience very uncomfortable drafts which seem to be coming directly from the windows and/or window surrounds.. they are very intense and very distinct.

    The building has an HVAC system but the Strata is not consistent about setting the heating in the corridors … sometimes it feels like they are continuing all winter with the equivalent of ‘cold’ setting on an air conditioner as in the warmest part of the summer. We had an energy consultant come in and do a blower door test, in fact he did 2 but his software somehow lost the data. He will be repeating the test at some stage soon. We are not sure what to do next as we cannot even find out the R and U Values of our windows. They are Starline windows installed in 2007. We are at UBC, so under the provincial building code, not under the city of Vancouver.

    We believe/know there is no insulation in the exterior walls and none in the window frames which are very very cold to touch.

    Any ideas of what we can do to improve our comfort and spend less on energy. I am thinking that some version of gas heat would be our next step, something more centrally located or the centre of the unit is better heated, and hopefully more evenly. There is no form of backup heat in the building and for example, this winter was very cold by Vancouver standards.

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